SUSTEX 2020 – Call for Papers

SUSTEX 2020 dates have been announced for 15-17 April.

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The 2nd SUSTEX International Summit at Texas A&M University – Central Texas focuses on United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and invites contributions about the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of the SDGs.

With the rollout of the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals for 2030, our universities train leaders to ensure that this ambitious international agenda can be met in an efficient, profitable, and socially responsible manner. We acknowledge that all national and regional contexts differ, and therefore it is critical that we analyze real world challenges for communities, firms, schools, and governments in localizing the SDGs.

Therefore, we encourage submissions within the following general themes:

  1. Leadership for Sustainability
  2. Strategic planning and management for long term sustainable economic growth
  3. Corporate social responsibility
  4. Responsible design and management of supply chains
  5. Construction/redesign/maintenance of resilient infrastructure and sustainable industrialization
  6. Food security and promotion of sustainable agriculture production
  7. Poverty alleviation through entrepreneurship
  8. Stakeholder partnership and collaboration and measurement to ensure localization of SDGs
  9. International management for sustainability
  10. Organizing for sustainable effectiveness
  11. Other themes you find to be relevant.

Submissions should be scoped locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally, as appropriate for your study.

Important dates:

  • Abstract deadline: 10 January 2020
  • Acceptances will be communicated on a rolling basis by: 3 February 2020
  • Full paper deadline for inclusion in proceedings: 1 April 2020

Summit Objectives

The goal of the SUSTEX is to bring current and future leaders together in the private sector, government, and academia together in a personalized environment (no more than 120 attendees) to reflect and discuss the current challenges and successes in advancing sustainable business practices and education. This conference is a full two-day format with a focus on your role in the field of sustainability. After a welcome dinner on Wednesday evening, the focus for Thursday is geared more to include private sector and government solutions and approaches, scheduled with keynote speakers/panels and breakout sessions. Friday will likely focus on academic aspects of sustainability through presentations of original research, teaching cases, and discussions about how to promote sustainability in higher education. The format on Friday may include workshops, roundtables, and research presentations.

For more information, including registration details, visit: https://www.tamuct.edu/coba/sustex.html

IPBES e-Conference: Transformative Change Assessment

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IPBES, the inter-governmental science-policy platform on biodiversity and ecosystem services, are organising an e-Conference on 9-11 October.

Its purpose is to seek the broadest possible input (scientists and other knowledge holders, representatives of Governments, and of institutions and organisations, etc.), at this very initial phase in the production of an IPBES assessment, to define the policy-relevant questions that the assessment will address, and to thus make the assessment as relevant as possible to a diversity of stakeholders. The purpose is not to define the structure at this early stage, nor the set of chapters, but to collect the policy-relevant questions that stakeholders would like to see addressed by the assessment.

Agenda

This on-line conference is taking place over 3 days, from Wednesday 9 October (Day 1), to Friday 11 October 2019 (Day 3).

We propose to dedicate day 1 to reflecting on “transformative change as a system change”, asking what transformative change is, why a system-change perspective may be crucial for the conservation, restoration and wise use of biodiversity, compared to incremental change, and in what context.
Day 2 would focus on what to changeand introduce key points of intervention (i.e. leverage points) would be conducive to change (e.g. embracing diverse visions of a good life, reducing consumption and wastes, unleashing values).
Finally, day 3 would discuss how to change the system, focusing on the types of management and governance interventions from a variety of actors that appear the most promising in various contexts (e.g. incentives, cross-sectoral cooperation, environmental law and implementation). Each part will begin with an introductory talk (15 mn), followed by a moderated oral exchange (2 hours), ending with a period of about 24 hours for written contributions.
All times are Central European Summer Time

Day 1 (Wednesday 9 October 2019): Introduction and topic 1 (transformative change as a system change)

Time Item
14.00–14.15 Welcome and introduction: Dr. Anne Larigauderie, IPBES Executive Secretary

  • Click here to view the welcoming remarks
  • For an introduction to IPBES and the webinar series please click here.
Topic 1: Transformative change as a system change
14.15-14.30 1.1 Introductory talk: Dr. Kai Chan, The University of British Columbia

  • Purpose: One expert will introduce the topic, and outline some of the key issues that the assessment could address, in order to initiate the discussion.
  • Click here to view the introductory talk and participate in the oral exchange
14.30-16.30 1.2 Oral exchange

  • Participants will, following the talk, be invited by the speaker, who will moderate the exchange, to react to its content, and to reflect on the following question, with an emphasis on solutions rather than on impacts:

What are in your opinion the most important questions that should be addressed by the transformative change assessment under topic 1?

  • Click here to view the introductory talk and participate in the oral exchange
16.30-until noon on Day 2 1.3 Online contributions

  • Participants are invited to send, between 16.30 and noon the next day, short and punchy written contributions, to complement this oral exchange, further addressing the question outlined above.
  • Click here to participate in the online forum

Day 2 (Thursday 10 October 2019): Topic 2 (What to change?)

Topic 2: What to change?
14.00-14.15 2.1 Introductory talk: Dr. Laura Maureen Bosch Pereira, Stellenbosch University

  • Purpose: One expert will introduce the topic, and outline some of the key issues that the assessment could address, in order to initiate the discussion.
  • Click here to view the introductory talk and participate in the oral exchange
14.15-16.15 2.2 Oral exchange

  • Participants will, following the talk, be invited by the speaker, who will moderate the exchange, to react to its content, and to reflect on the following question, with an emphasis on solutions rather than on impacts:

What are in your opinion the most important questions that should be addressed by the transformative change assessment under topic 2?

  • Click here to view the introductory talk and participate in the oral exchange
16.15-noon on Day 3 2.3 Online contributions

  • Participants are invited to send, between 16.15 and noon the next day, short and punchy written contributions, to complement this oral exchange, further addressing the question outlined above.
  • Click here to participate in the online forum

Day 3 (Friday 11 October 2019): Topic 3 (How to change the system?)

Topic 3: How to change the system?
14.00-14.15 3.1 Introductory talk: Dr. Karen O’Brien, University of Oslo

  • Purpose: One expert will introduce the topic, and outline some of the key issues that the assessment could address, in order to initiate the discussion.
  • Click here to view the introductory talk and participate in the oral exchange
14.15-16.15 3.2 Oral exchange

  • Participants will, following the talk, be invited by the speaker, who will moderate the exchange, to react to its content, and to reflect on the following question, with an emphasis on solutions rather than on impacts:

What are in your opinion the most important questions that should be addressed by the transformative change assessment, under topic 3?

  • Click here to view the introductory talk and participate in the oral exchange
16.15 until noon on 3rd October 3.3 Online contributions

  • Participants are invited to send, between 16.30 and noon the next day, short and punchy written contributions, to complement this oral exchange, further addressing the question outlined above.
  • Click here to participate in the online forum

How can you join the online conference?

To view the introductory talks and participate in the oral exchanges, please click on the links in the schedule at the indicated times or use the links below.To participate in the online fora, please click on the links in the schedule or in the right-hand menue.

Please note that you need to be logged-in on the IPBES website in order to contribute to the fora.
If you do not have an IPBES account yet, please register here.
Webinar Forum
Transformative change as a system change Day 1 webinar, 2pm – 4.30pm CEST Day 1 forum
What to change? Day 2 webinar, 2pm – 4.15pm CEST Day 2 forum
How To change a system Day 3 webinar, 2pm – 4.15pm CEST Day 3 forum

https://www.ipbes.net/online-conference-seek-input-scoping-process-transformative-change-assessment-9-11-october-2019

Does the Nobel Economics Prize promote the economic thinking we need to meet the challenges of the 21st century?

This post is provided by OPEN Fellow, Henry Leveson-Gower, who is Founder and CEO of Promoting Economic Pluralism, a growing movement of progressive, pluralist economists from across academia, government, industry and civil society, campaigning for fresh economic thinking for the 21st century.

 

Dear OPEN colleagues,

In October, the Nobel Prize in Economics will celebrate its 50th anniversary. At Promoting Economic Pluralism, we have joined forces with a fantastic group of organisations to use this milestone to highlight the need for new economic thinking for the 21st century – and would really value you and your organisation’s support in doing this. You can see more about why, how and with whom we are doing this on our website here.

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We would really appreciate your support to get as many people as possible engaged in this campaign through both the debate on the legitimacy of the Nobel Economics Prize and finding fresh economics for the 21st century. This could be through various means:

  • RT-ing and sharing our campaign posts with #NotTheNobel sent from @themintmag and Promoting Economic Pluralism on Facebook
  • Putting an item in your newsletter (if you have one) – we can provide a paragraph with a link to our website
  • Holding an event on these issues, particularly on 3rd October at 7pm UK time, when we will be live-streaming our final event and selecting our leading new economic thinkers/doers

To generate interest in the ‘Not The Nobel’ project, we will be producing a series of blogs, a video, social media content and other products so there should be lots of stuff to share and link up with.

I would really appreciate any help you can give to use this opportunity to get more people engaged with the need to change our economic system to get off the disastrous path that we seem to be on.

It would also be great if you could join one of our launch webinars at 9.00am and 6.00pm UK time on Monday 2nd September (sign up here), when we are going to:

  • Start a debate with invited panellists on whether economics should have a Nobel Prize linked with it; and
  • Open our online platform on which anyone can nominate, discuss and vote on who they think are providing the economic thinking and action we need to meet the challenges of the 21st century

If you’re interest in being part of the ‘Not The Nobel’ project – or can support in any way – please email me (henry.leveson-gower@economicpluralism.org) or our Programme Director, Nat Dyer (nat.dyer@economicpluralism.org), letting us know how you think you can help.

Many thanks,

 

Henry

Henry Leveson-Gower FRSA

Founder and CEO, Promoting Economic Pluralism

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Songs of Hope For The Planet

by Tony Cooke, CEO, One Planet Education Networks

Here’s a little something uplifting for the weekend. Recently, I had the great pleasure of being in the audience for TEDxExeter and got to see Chris and Harry, fresh from the Edinburgh Festival, perform a couple of ‘Songs of Hope For The Planet’. They’re now available on video here. Enjoy!…

The New Political Story That Could Change Everything

To get out of the mess we’re in, we need a new story that explains the present and guides the future, says author George Monbiot. Drawing on findings from psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary biology, he offers a new vision for society built around our fundamental capacity for altruism and cooperation.

This contagiously optimistic talk will make you rethink the possibilities for our shared future. It was given at the recent TED Summit in Edinburgh, a global gathering of 1,000 TED Speakers, TED Fellows, TED Translators, TED-ED volunteers and TEDx organisers. OPEN CEO Tony Cooke was there in person in his capacity as a TEDx organiser.

It will resonate well with those in the OPEN Community who are focused on pluralist economics, on post-neoliberalism or humanistic management. It will also be of interest to anyone researching the power of narratives, i.e. the stories we tell ourselves, and how they drive our behaviour.

About George Monbiot

As a young man, George Monbiot spent six years working as an investigative journalist in West Papua, Brazil and East Africa, during which time he was shot at, shipwrecked, beaten up, stung into a poisoned coma by hornets, became lost for days in a rainforest (where he ate rats and insects to avert starvation) and (incorrectly) pronounced clinically dead in a hospital in northern Kenya. Today, he leads a less adventurous life as an author, columnist for the Guardian and environmental campaigner.

Among his books and projects are Feral: Rewilding the Land, Sea and Human LifeThe Age of Consent; and Heat: How to Stop the Planet Burning. His latest book is Out of the Wreckage: A New Politics for an Age of Crisis. He has made a number of viral videos. One of them, “How Wolves Change Rivers,” based on an extract from his last TED Talk, has been watched 40 million times on YouTube.

Scotland’s First Minister speaks out on Wellbeing Economy in new TED Talk

In 2018, Scotland, Iceland and New Zealand established the network of Wellbeing Economy Governments (WEGo) to challenge the acceptance of GDP as the ultimate measure of a country’s success. In this visionary talk, First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon explains the far-reaching implications of a “well-being economy” — which places factors like equal pay, childcare, mental health and access to green space at its heart — and shows how this new focus could help build resolve to confront global challenges.

This new TED Talk from Nicola Sturgeon was given at the recent TED Summit in Edinburgh, the global gathering of the TED community of TED Speakers, TED Fellows, TED-ED community, TED Translators and TEDx organisers. OPEN CEO Tony Cooke was there in person in his capacity as a TEDx organiser.

In November 2014, Nicola Sturgeon was elected as the first female leader of the Scottish National Party. Days later, she was sworn in as the country’s first woman First Minister. Soon after her election, she appointed a cabinet boasting a 50/50 gender balance.

As head of the Scottish government, Sturgeon is responsible for her administration’s policies and for promoting and representing Scotland both at home and overseas.

Sturgeon entered the Scottish Parliament as a regional MSP for Glasgow in 1999. She is currently MSP for Glasgow Southside. Sturgeon served as Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing between 2007 and 2012, and then Cabinet Secretary for Infrastructure, Investment and Cities until November 2014. Throughout this period she also served as Deputy First Minister of Scotland.

Earth Overshoot Day 29 July 2019

A couple of days ago on 29 July was 2019’s Earth Overshoot Day, marking the date when humanity’s demand for ecological resources and services in a given year exceeds what Earth can regenerate in that year. We maintain this deficit by liquidating stocks of ecological resources and accumulating waste, primarily carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Earth Overshoot Day is hosted and calculated by Global Footprint Network, an international research organization that provides decision-makers with a menu of tools to help the human economy operate within Earth’s ecological limits.

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To determine the date of Earth Overshoot Day for each year, Global Footprint Network calculates the number of days of that year that Earth’s biocapacity suffices to provide for humanity’s Ecological Footprint. The remainder of the year corresponds to global overshoot. Earth Overshoot Day is computed by dividing the planet’s biocapacity (the amount of ecological resources Earth is able to generate that year), by humanity’s Ecological Footprint (humanity’s demand for that year), and multiplying by 365, the number of days in a year:

(Planet’s Biocapacity / Humanity’s Ecological Footprint) x 365 = Earth Overshoot Day

 

Measuring Ecological Wealth

Just as a bank statement tracks income against expenditures, Global Footprint Network measures a population’s demand for and ecosystems’ supply of resources and services. These calculations then serve as the foundation for calculating Earth Overshoot Day.

On the supply side, a city, state, or nation’s biocapacity represents its biologically productive land and sea area, including forest lands, grazing lands, cropland, fishing grounds, and built-up land.

On the demand side, the Ecological Footprintmeasures a population’s demand for plant-based food and fiber products, livestock and fish products, timber and other forest products, space for urban infrastructure, and forest to absorb its carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels.

Both measures are expressed in global hectares—globally comparable, standardized hectares with world average productivity. A hectare is equivalent to 10,000 square meters or 2.47 acres

Each city, state or nation’s Ecological Footprint can be compared to its biocapacity. If a population’s demand for ecological assets exceeds the supply, that region runs an ecological deficit. A region in ecological deficit meets demand by importing, liquidating its own ecological assets (such as overfishing), and/or emitting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

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At the global level, ecological deficit and overshoot are the same, since there is no net import of resources to the planet.

History

The concept of Earth Overshoot Day was first conceived by Andrew Simms of the UK think tank New Economics Foundation, which partnered with Global Footprint Network in 2006 to launch the first global Earth Overshoot Day campaign. At that time, Earth Overshoot Day fell in October. WWF, the world’s largest conservation organization, has participated in Earth Overshoot Day since 2007.  

https://www.overshootday.org